Sunday, October 18, 2020

The Dogs Of COVID




The dogs are sad

since March

which is usually good dog-walking weather

cool and snappy on a dog’s wet nose

rich with scent, over-full of doggie news


but the dogs quickly sensed 

that something was wrong

their barometers sagged with their tails

a sad indicator

they sense the extreme change in air pressure, like the baby elephant that rescued a little boy from the beach just before the tsunami hit, like the other elephants that bellowed and trumpeted warning tourists and citizens in vain


At first, the dogs were delirious with joy!

Bouncing off walls and sofas and floors!

Mommy’s home! Daddy’s home! This is great! Everybody’s home!

Hugs and kisses and treats and snuggles!


but those walks


The news wasn’t good

the doggie news

that they read on the tree roots, on the corners and curbstones


They sniff, sniff, sniff

sniff again

and slink away sad


not elated and full of fascination like they used to be


No more hugs from passing children

No more cookies or treats or pats from greeting friends

people pull their leashes away


The pointer

doesn’t point any more

he sneaks by hiding behind his long ears

his tail wiping the sidewalk


The ugly rescue dogs

used to be ecstatic to face the world with their mixed breed

all wrong and not cute

suddenly slowed to durges

scraping the ground

with their blunt ears and bony tails


The golden doodle twins

once in training for show

once joyous twin chaos

yanked back by a firm leash


gone, just gone


For a short time in April

the tails seemed to lift like flags no longer half-staff

for no reason at all as dog do, 

for heat or cool, for rain or sun


dropped down again in June


Only one - an English cream golden -

prances in front of her healthy humans, 

masks at their throats, at the ready, just in case they might need a mask,

her head up, her tail high

her long coat flowing like a stallion’s mane


That sheep dog on TV is a clue

confused and fearful, his head jerks back

from the masked girl that cradles his face in her hands


and the dogs that bark at masks


know something is wrong


But, Lou’s got it good

Lou is my spirit dog

a big bull I would name Tony if he were mine

Lou’s got it right


Lou is sleeping through



Lou


©Patricia Goodwin, 2020

Patricia Goodwin is the author of When Two Women Die, about Marblehead legends and true crime and its sequel, Dreamwater, about the Salem witch trials and the vicious 11-year-old pirate Ned Low. Holy Days is her third novel, about the sexual, psychological seduction of Gloria Wisher and her subsequent transformation. Her latest novel is Low Flying, about two women suffering psychologically abusive marriages who find and nurture each other. Her newest poetry books are Telling Time By Apples, And Other Poems About Life On The Remnants of Olde Humphrey Farme, illustrated by the author, and Java Love: Poems of a Coffeehouse.


Within this blog, Patricia writes often about non-fiction subjects that inspire or disturb her, hopefully informing and inspiring people to be happy, healthy and free.



Sunday, September 27, 2020

Faith: A Writer's Life

 


Charlotte Bronte Resolute


Sometimes I think a writer’s life is really many writers’ lives. One of the most moving and illustrative examples of this idea is this image of Charlotte Bronte from the BBC drama, To Walk Invisible: The Bronte Sisters. Charlotte has in her arms, safely tucked under her meager shawl, protected more than she is from the driving rain from which everyone else is running, the precious manuscript of Jane Eyre. Where would the generations of future writers be if not for the fortitude, determination, and faith of Charlotte Bronte? Faith, the thing that carries her forward along that stormy path out into the world. 


I remember Betty Smith walking her dog at midnight, mailing her manuscript and wondering if anyone would ever get excited enough about her book to publish it. They did; it was A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. I think of Jerome Salinger sending story after story to The New Yorker Magazine, rejected every time until Ernest Hemingway served with him in Europe and called him over to the bar, “Hey, Jerry! Jerry! Everyone, this guy’s a helluva writer!”


F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby only sold a few copies until the United States Army wanted to create small paperbacks for soldiers to carry with them; they chose Fitzgerald’s little book. The soldiers loved the story of the girl, the car and the house, The American Dream, reading it over and over, sharing the hand  sized books, causing such a demand for the story that Fitzgerald was restored as a great writer.


I am struck anew by the long road of writing. I look at my own work - Telling Time By Apples And Other Poems About Life On The Remnants of Olde Humphrey Farme, for instance. It took years and years of heavy yard work and gardening - me digging, planting, raking, weeding, pruning; me creating a wheelbarrow out of a huge tree branch to haul gigantic loads of yard waste, me planting the infinitesimal seeds, nurturing the tiniest seedlings that could drown if watered if not lifted patiently by hand out of the puddles, these would grow to be cosmos taller than me that the goldfinches used to sway on, chirping deliriously. It took the subsequent illness, followed by recovery and the slow regaining of strength, the tyranny of the garden, the terror of winter, the slow recovery of Spring, the clean, new, fresh garden! When I wrote that long poem, I was sure no one would appreciate it, but I was wrong. Everyone who has ever gardened can’t help but shudder and sigh when they read it.


Besides all the living that is required, I also make my own books (with the help of my team, my daughter and husband). Perhaps every writer should have to physically make their books at least once! I decided to illustrate Telling Time By Apples. I didn’t know anything about making illustrations, which is very different from painting or drawing. These paintings or drawings are specifically made for print, which is a different matter. I could only paint on canvas, so that’s what I did, hoping the images would have a quaint, sampler look. 


I designed the cover, which was meant to have an apple flaming with autumn leaves. It was my husband who added the robin. Together, we chose the paper color to match the parchment look of the cover. We chose the typeface and the spacing of the lines and the margins. Then, I was propped up in a program called InDesign where I set the type and images. 




Thanks to Amazon’s publishing program, we are able to publish and sell books. This is pretty much the process of making our books: First, years of real life agony or joy, then writing, then the physical book. My daughter often created the covers, using my design joined with her art work or photography. She took the photos of the marble on the cover of my poetry book Atlantis and the deep blue water on the cover of Dreamwater. She painted the airplane on Java Love: Poems of a Coffeehouse, a cover designed around her original painting and the idea of daydreaming over coffee, plus the fact that the owner of the cafĂ© had been a pilot. She designed the striking, glossy black cover for When Two Women Die. And, together, we bravely created the muted grey cover of Holy Days using a vintage photo of me at three-years-old. 






I am reminded of Virginia Woolf who, at Hogarth Press, set the type manually, letter by letter, with her husband, Leonard. Or, similarly, D.H. Lawrence having his banned books printed in Italy, letter by letter, by a printer who could not read English.


Woody Allen once said that he didn’t know where the words came from, no one really does, but they come and he’s grateful for them. I remember being extremely nervous at one of my first readings, in a little shop called Ironic, run by two women, one who made wrought iron furniture and objects, another who painted furniture. She had painted a lovely Italian countryside mural on the shop wall by which I was sitting. I loved being in such a charming, work-rich environment. I looked down at the book in my lap and saw my daughter’s graphic and exciting artwork on the cover of my poetry book, Marblehead Moon - a wild rendition of the  moon, the stars, and the ocean that she had made when she was quite young - and I thought, “What am I nervous about? The words are right here!” I still remember the warm rush of faith that enveloped me.




You see I believe the words come from God, or, if you will, the Universe. That is my faith. One’s talent and one’s work, they are a trust handed to the writer. The writer must then carry and carry and carry that work out into the world. I am grateful for my readers, the ones whose faces beam, who proudly tell me in the supermarket, “Patricia! I read your book!” chin jutted out in pride. I remember the woman at a reading who reached out and touched my arm as I passed her after reading, on my way back to my chair. Thank you, dear heart, I feel your touch every time I despair. I remember the gasps from the crowd. Gasps! Can I really be so lucky? Hey, I also remember the potato chip bag and the crunching of chips in the audience - infinitely more compelling than poetry at times!


Lately, we have just finished publishing Low Flying, a stunning dark green book with type that truly glimmers like gold though it is only gold in color. Though Low Flying is fictionalized, it came out of many painful conversations I had over the years with women telling me horror stories about their marriages; also plenty of lurid town gossip, as well as my own experiences with an abusive boss that I wished I could - well, the imagination can be very therapeutic. In Low Flying two women who suffer psychologically abusive marriages, gain strength from the simple act of working together in the nurturing environment of a beautiful old greenhouse. So, you see, years of suffering, years of writing, months of grunt work at the computer. In writing the book, I was especially proud of the “garden quotes” at the top of each chapter which I found over years of reading, some tidbit from the garden or from poetry, literature, even movies that enlightens the thought and action to follow.




Low Flying was finished in the late ‘90s. I’ve kept it close all that time, hoping one day to get it from manuscript to actual book form. My husband, who began in the book business, is very proud of this book. Right now, we have my author’s copy on the dining room table. He admires it every time he walks by, “You got yourself a beautiful book there!” Or “Look at that shine! You’d think it was gold leaf!” Or he’ll pick it up and say, “It even has a nice hand.” That’s the way a book feels if it feels good in your hand.


Faith.




©PatriciaGoodwin, 2020


Patricia Goodwin is the author of When Two Women Die, about Marblehead legends and true crime and its sequel, Dreamwater, about the Salem witch trials and the vicious 11-year-old pirate Ned Low. Holy Days is her third novel, about the sexual, psychological seduction of Gloria Wisher and her subsequent transformation. Her latest novel is Low Flying, about two women suffering psychologically abusive marriages who find and nurture each other. Her newest poetry books are Telling Time By Apples, And Other Poems About Life On The Remnants of Olde Humphrey Farme, illustrated by the author, and Java Love: Poems of a Coffeehouse.


Within this blog, Patricia writes often about non-fiction subjects that inspire or disturb her, hopefully informing and inspiring people to be happy, healthy and free.





Friday, September 4, 2020

This Machine Fights Fascists




Where I grew up in Revere, the mailbox at the bottom of our hill was often attacked - older kids would throw a dead squirrel in, garbage, trash, then, finally rip it off the sidewalk and throw it in the street. The city would come and replace it eventually, and the whole process would begin again; the violence came from those who would never write a letter, pay a bill or have the sophistication to buy a stamp and put it on an envelope. 

I was about 12 years old when, one day, our mailbox was gone; I already had two pen-pals I couldn’t reach: one, from England, he didn’t work out as he only wanted nude photos of me; the other, a Native-American boy in Pocatello, Idaho. I liked him. Both pen-pals had been found in teen magazines.

Without the mailbox, my mother couldn’t send cards or pay her bills. My mother couldn’t drive a car, and, even if she could, my father would have taken it to work. Like most of the people now who are left without a mailbox in their neighborhood, my mother didn’t have the time or the energy to go look for the nearest mailbox. Finally, she asked the mailman to pick up her mail when he delivered, and, thankfully, he did.

I’ve been thinking of our old mailbox lately as Trump tears up the USPS, as he vandalizes our mailboxes and mail sorters, as he leaves Americans who don’t have the internet without the means to communicate.  

As a writer, my whole impetus is to communicate. With no mailbox at the end of our street, we had lost a significant part of our Freedom of Speech. 

My gut reaction to seeing the mailboxes and sorting machines piled up in a dead heap was tears in my eyes. How many times have I cried because I felt like I had lost my country? Naomi Wolf calls this phenomenon, “American tears” in her book, “The End Of America: Letter Of Warning To A Young Patriot.” She calls on people to act, not cry. I’m weak, so I cry and I write.

DO YOU REMEMBER WHEN THE UNITED STATES WOULD REFUSE TO RECOGNIZE ANY COUNTRY THAT HAD INTERFERED IN ITS OWN FREE ELECTIONS? Now, here we have the President of the United States interfering in the 2020 Presidential Election by closing polls, and taking this point in time to sabotage the United States Post Office, thus taking Freedom of Speech away from thousands of citizens.

"MAIL DELIVERY SUSPENSIONS IN LOS ANGELES: Los Angeles City Council member, Mike Bonin joins The Appeal to discuss the ongoing mail crisis on the Westside of Los Angeles, where the U.S. Postal Service has suspended mail service to an entire low-income community, overwhelmingly consisting of people of color. Instead of having their mail delivered, these residents are being forced to travel to pick up their mail from the post office that is over a mile away. This action will have significant and severe consequences for community members who do not own or have access to a car to drive to the postal facility, are seniors or people with disabilities, or are essential workers who are juggling job responsibilities while trying to educate their children at home and do not have the flexibility or the time to have to go to an offsite location to retrieve their mail. The postal service’s action disenfranchises them, and denies them access to essentials, such as their income, medicine, and voting and election information."


Woody Guthrie

So, I’ve been thinking too of Woody Guthrie’s mission to Kill Fascists - I’ve softened the word kill, changing it to FIGHT. Most woke people know that Woody wrote “This Machine Kills Fascists” on his guitar. Woody’s idea of a fascist was any rich bully who was taking from the poor. During the Depression, Woody would have seen many farms and homes go into foreclosure, many families living in tents, trucks, shanties. He characterized fascism “as a form of economic exploitation similar to slavery, straightforwardly denouncing the fascists – particularly their leaders – as a group of gangsters who set out to 'rob the world.’” (John S. Partington (2011). The Life, Music and Thought of Woody Guthrie: A Critical Appraisal.)

Woody romanticized bank robbers like Bonnie & Clyde, John Dillinger, Jesse James and Pretty Boy Floyd as folk heroes who got a bit of justice back from the banks who were robbing the poor.

Woody’s own political activism was his songs like “Tear The Fascists Down” and “All You Fascists Bound To Lose," thus working the Fascist Killing Machine!


Woody Guthrie
"All You Fascists Bound To Lose"

In a similar political act of deviance, postal workers in Washington State reinstalled high-speed mail sorting machines despite USPS orders not to put machines back in use. Go Washington!

What other political acts can we do? We’re already doing it! Helping our neighbors to get to the polls! Serving free meals! Healing the sick! Wearing a mask! Social distancing! Eating healthy! Teaching others to be healthy! And free! I can’t help but feel that all the signs of hope and encouragement that people are putting up on their lawns and homes are their way of communicating during a time when they cannot communicate.

I’ll end by posting another of Woody’s songs - we can do it!


Tear the Fascists Down 
with music, powerful words and love!

©Patricia Goodwin, 2020

Patricia Goodwin is the author of When Two Women Die, about Marblehead legends and true crime and its sequel, Dreamwater, about the Salem witch trials and the vicious 11-year-old pirate Ned Low. Holy Days is her third novel, about the sexual, psychological seduction of Gloria Wisher and her subsequent transformation. Her newest poetry books are Telling Time By Apples, And Other Poems About Life On The Remnants of Olde Humphrey Farme, illustrated by the author, and Java Love: Poems of a Coffeehouse.

Within this blog, Patricia writes often about non-fiction subjects that inspire or disturb her, hopefully informing and inspiring people to be happy, healthy and free.



Friday, July 31, 2020

How To Strengthen Your Immune System Against COVID






"You did it! You finally did it! You blew it all up!"



This is what I see and hear every time I see a person with a mask. 

I'm not an anti-masker. I dutifully wear my mask. Mostly, out of courtesy. 

Not that I can't catch COVID. I could. 

But, I'm macrobiotic. I have tools. 

I and many others have been trying to tell everyone in the nation about these tools for - are you ready for it? 

For over 50 years! 

We macros have been telling you what you need to do to be healthy and happy for over 50 years!

The best tools I have are yin and yang and my own strong immune system.

The key to dealing with the Coronavirus is to strengthen your immune system. Even if you've already trashed your immune system on years of junk food, you most likely can build it up again.

It’s so simple and we all learned it in school. I can’t help thinking - There are two kinds of people in the world: those who paid attention in school and those who didn’t.

Here is a break-down of what you can do to make your own immune system strong: 

1. The Triangle of Health: Nutrition, Sleep, Exercise has always been a basic part of my life and it’s so simple, though not always easy to implement. Often, we can’t get the sleep we need, nor do we have time to exercise. However, nutrition should never be allowed to slacken. 

2. The Healthy Plate:



Though recently re-emerged from Harvard, this simple plate has been with me since elementary school. I have, since then, updated my protein from meat to a healthy vegetable protein of beans, or occasional good quality fish. (Our fish supply has also been usurped by factory farms, so it is not as easy to find good fish as it used to be. Be careful: good fish looks good and smells fresh and clean; its edges are moist, not dry and curled; it smells sweet, not fishy; the flesh is white, not yellow or rubbery.

We must make the effort to find good food! Real whole foods at places like Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, good quality markets, co-ops, buy directly from the farm if you have to! You'll be surprised how many are delivering during COVID lockdown!

3. Fresh air! Open a window! Get that fresh air circulating in your home! (Remember, the worst places for COVID deaths - stuffy, stale, enclosed spaces with recycled “air” - old age homes, airplanes, factories, hotels, cruise ships and, the worst - HOSPITALS!) 

4. Sunshine! Go outside! If you can’t go outside, open a window and stick your head out! Ten minutes a day is enough to get Vitamin D to strengthen your immune system. Even on cloudy days, enough sun gets through.


It's so simple, not always easy, but A LOT easier than being sick! 

People on my Facebook are still posting marshmallows - how do you like yours? Barely toasted or charred? And flavors of ice cream - which one is you? 

Americans are not eating real food. 

What Americans are eating all day every day are fake oils created in the lab and flavored to resemble the thing they think they’re eating whether that is peanut butter or cheese, ice cream or cake, breakfast cereals or donuts, tacos or hot dogs.

Fake oils are not human nutrition. We can eat them occasionally without creating too many problems in the body, but they do not nourish our bodies. 

Many Americans have NEVER eaten real food.

What is really happening when a young person contracts the coronavirus and does well for a while but then crashes and dies? The doctors say that young person was "healthy and had no previously existing conditions.” But, they were NOT healthy and DID have a previous condition which was malnutrition and a compromised immune system.

You really don’t have to give up your comfort foods. Just limit them. 

You don’t really have to give up all meat. Choose wisely. Better cuts, organic chicken, good quality fish. 

Adding brown rice to your plate will begin to change you in amazing new ways!

After a while, you’ll notice the difference in the way you feel after you eat a good dinner of brown rice, broiled fish and salad, strawberries for dessert.


©Patricia Goodwin, 2020


Other sources for good healthy choices are:

Denny Waxman's macrobiotic cookbook, The Ultimate Guide to Eating for Longevity: The Macrobiotic Way to Live a Long, Healthy, and Happy Life

If you wish to start macrobiotics - with personal advice and guidance - dennywaxman.com


Allen Campbell: Nutrition Studies Allen Campbell was Tom Brady's nutrition coach and chef. His advice on inflammatory foods has helped me a great deal with any occasional pain.

Hip Chicks Guide to Macrobiotics







Patricia Goodwin is the author of When Two Women Die, about Marblehead legends and true crime and its sequel, Dreamwater, about the Salem witch trials and the vicious 11-year-old pirate Ned Low. Holy Days is her third novel, about the sexual, psychological seduction of Gloria Wisher and her subsequent transformation. Her newest poetry books are Telling Time By Apples, And Other Poems About Life On The Remnants of Olde Humphrey Farme, illustrated by the author, and Java Love: Poems of a Coffeehouse.



Patricia has been a practicing macrobiotic for 46 years. 

Within this blog, Patricia writes often about non-fiction subjects that inspire or disturb her, hopefully informing and inspiring people to be happy, healthy and free. 



Monday, June 22, 2020

COVID Comfort Food





iHop's Cereal Pancakes


Why do some people deal with Coronavirus so well? The answer is simple - they have strong immune systems.

During our enforced stay-at-home, so many of my friends have been posting their comfort foods on social media. One friend dreamed of this blue concoction - image above - from iHop. Another posted a fluffernutter sandwich - peanut butter and marshmallow on white bread. One friend, who does yoga and wears her mask faithfully, consumes a candy bar for breakfast now and then.


Fluffernutter Sandwich

We all have our comfort foods. I do too. I always say that it’s our favorite food and drink that will get us in the end. But, it’s been two months of quarantine and it really is about time to stop eating fake food comfort foods.

Pizza. How many pizzas have been sold during lockdown? Can you believe that pizza makers have sold record numbers of pizzas during COVID? 


Frozen Pizza

It’s hard to believe that Americans could actually eat more pizza.

Americans have bought approximately $275 million worth of frozen pizza since the start of the coronavirus pandemic in March. That’s an increase of 92 percent compared to the same time last year. 

“It’s incredible,” says Gina Bolger, vice president of branding for Home Run Inn Pizza in the Detroit area, which is churning out as many as 85,000 pizzas a day at its 60,000-square-foot factory in Woodridge, Illinois.

“We equate this to every day being like Super Bowl Sunday — the orders don’t stop. The demand is through the roof. We’re trying to keep up as best we can,” she says. 

And, that’s just frozen pizza. Pizza parlors have also been delivering take-out!

What do fluffernutters, iHop pancakes and frozen pizza have in common? They’re not real food. They’re fake oils made in the lab.



Let’s face it - Americans are not eating real food. 

Many Americans have NEVER eaten real food.

Take the fluffernutter - most peanut butter on the supermarket shelf has very little actual peanuts in it. It’s a fake oil made to taste like peanuts whipped to a dreamy texture with lots of sugar to make it the most popular brand. The same with pizza cheese - very little actual dairy. In fact, dairy has very little actual dairy since the cows do not graze on growing grass and are fed hormones, antibiotics and Genetically Modified corn and soy (in no way their natural diet).

What Americans are eating all day every day are fake oils created in the lab and flavored to resemble the thing they think they’re eating whether that is peanut butter or cheese, ice cream or cake, breakfast cereals or donuts, tacos or hot dogs.

Fake oils are not human nutrition. We can eat them occasionally without creating too many problems in the body, but they do not nourish our bodies. 

Fake oils made in the lab create lots of excess mucus in the body during illness when your body is trying to get the mucus out, i.e. the lung phase of the coronavirus when breathing can become so difficult. These fake foods are also flavored with large amounts of salt and artificial lab-created flavorings, i.e. chemicals, which can create more mucus in the body.

Meat is another culprit. Meat has huge amounts of salt already in it before meat products are flavored again with more salt and chemicals. Meat eating has been linked to the occasional overactivity of the immune system in COVID patients that die suddenly after seeming to be improving.

What is really happening when a young person contracts the coronavirus and does well for a while but then crashes and dies? The doctors say that young person was "healthy and had no previously existing conditions.” But, they were NOT healthy and DID have a previous condition which was malnutrition and a compromised immune system.

The key to dealing with the Coronavirus is to strengthen your immune system.

It’s so simple and we all learned it in school. I can’t help thinking - There are two kinds of people in the world: those who paid attention in school and those who didn’t.

1. The Triangle of Health: Nutrition, Sleep, Exercise has always been a basic part of my life and it’s so simple, though not always easy to implement. Often, we can’t get the sleep we need, nor do we have time to exercise. However, nutrition should never be allowed to slacken. 

2. The Healthy Plate:



Though recently re-emerged from Harvard, this simple plate has been with me since elementary school. I have, since then, updated my protein from meat to a healthy vegetable protein of beans, or occasional good quality fish. (Our fish supply has also been usurped by factory farms, so it is not as easy to find good fish as it used to be. Be careful: good fish looks good and smells fresh and clean; its edges are moist, not dry and curled; it smells sweet, not fishy; the flesh is white, not yellow or rubbery.

We must make the effort to find good food! Real whole foods at places like Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, good quality markets, co-ops, buy directly from the farm if you have to! You'll be surprised how many are delivering during COVID lockdown!

3. Fresh air! Open a window! Get that fresh air circulating in your home! (Remember, the worst places for COVID deaths - stuffy, stale, enclosed spaces with recycled “air” - old age homes, airplanes, factories, hotels, cruise ships and, the worst - HOSPITALS!) 

4. Sunshine! Go outside! If you can’t go outside, open a window and stick your head out! Ten minutes a day is enough to get Vitamin D to strengthen your immune system. Even on cloudy days, enough sun gets through.

Years ago, I lived near a convenience store and would see construction workers - otherwise, strong healthy young men - coming out of the store with their lunches of huge bags of chips and a bottle of Coke, as Jay Leno used to say, “Bigger than their bladder!” 

You can eat chips or Twinkies or frozen pizza for your meals if you like or you may choose health.

You don’t really have to give up all meat. Choose wisely. Better cuts, organic chicken, good quality fish. Adding brown rice to your plate will begin to change you in amazing new ways!

You really don’t have to give up your comfort foods. Just limit them. After a while, you’ll notice the difference in the way you feel after you eat that Cap’n Crunch pancake stack compared to how much better you feel after a good dinner of brown rice, broiled fish and salad, strawberries for dessert; you won’t dream about iHop any more. 



Other sources for good healthy choices are:

Denny Waxman's macrobiotic cookbook, The Ultimate Guide to Eating for Longevity: The Macrobiotic Way to Live a Long, Healthy, and Happy Life

If you wish to start macrobiotics - with personal advice and guidance - dennywaxman.com


Allen Campbell: Nutrition Studies Allen Campbell was Tom Brady's nutrition coach and chef. His advice on inflammatory foods has helped me a great deal with any occasional pain.

Hip Chicks Guide to Macrobiotics
Edward Esko online Coronavirus Lecture



©Patricia Goodwin, 2020


Patricia Goodwin is the author of When Two Women Die, about Marblehead legends and true crime and its sequel, Dreamwater, about the Salem witch trials and the vicious 11-year-old pirate Ned Low. Holy Days is her third novel, about the sexual, psychological seduction of Gloria Wisher and her subsequent transformation. Her newest poetry books are Telling Time By Apples, And Other Poems About Life On The Remnants of Olde Humphrey Farme, illustrated by the author, and Java Love: Poems of a Coffeehouse.

Patricia has been a practicing macrobiotic for 46 years. 

Within this blog, Patricia writes often about non-fiction subjects that inspire or disturb her, hopefully informing and inspiring people to be happy, healthy and free.